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En Route: A Career Blog

Is Your Resume Getting the Attention It Deserves?

AUTHOR: Darlene Zambruski
CATEGORY: , ,
POSTED: March 1, 2013 at 8:52 am

Although the economy has been improving – very slowly – competition for jobs is still very stiff out there.

According to an article on biginterview.com, one in four HR managers receive 50 resumes per job opening. One in ten receive 100 resumes for each listing. Clearly, that’s a lot of a paper for a hiring manager to sift through. By the 10th or 15th document, most individuals will be glazing over because of the sameness of these resumes, their lack of impact.

Getting Your Resume Noticed

It’s not about using fancy graphics and colored fonts. Bells and whistles aren’t what hiring managers are looking for in a candidate’s resume. What most of them want is a background that’s a perfect fit with the job description. However, it’s not enough to write – “I did this.” “I did that.” Because you’re a stranger to the hiring manager – an unknown – whatever you claim on your resume is your opinion, not fact.

provingyourworth

Proving Your Worth

The only way to get the hiring authority to sit up and take notice of your resume when you’re competing against dozens or hundreds of equally-qualified candidates is to make certain the focus of your document is on accomplishments, not tasks.

Daily duties don’t excite anyone, including the person who wants to hire a new employee. Whether you’re an administrative assistant or an accountant, what you do at ABC company is probably the same as what another candidate, in the same role, does at DEF company. Therefore, the results of your efforts are what matter.

Quantified Accomplishments Will Put You Over the Top

Let’s say you’re an admin assistant and you write on your resume – “Update files on a regular basis.” Chances are, every one of the other 50-100 candidates will state the same.

Writing that same statement with the results of your efforts gives a broader and more impactful picture. For example, our admin assistant would write – “Improved productivity 40% by updating files on a regular basis, saving ABC company $3500 annually.”

Figures Tell a Story – Your Story of Accomplishment

If you don’t include results for your daily duties, it’s assumed by hiring managers that you’re doing as little as possible to collect a paycheck, or that your job isn’t all that necessary. If it was eliminated and you were laid off, no one would really notice.

Do you really want your resume to say that about you?

Nothing is more important in a resume than quantified accomplishments. A resume should begin with one, preferably two, recent/relevant/quantified achievements in the opening summary. A Career Accomplishments sections should follow this, further detailing results. Even in the Professional Experience section, which historically lists duties, there should be some kind of a result of your actions.

Not everyone is scrambling for a job in these poor economic times. Those who are savvy and know what an employer most wants to see, make certain they submit results-based resumes, rather than one that simply lists daily duties.

The certified writers at ResumeEdge are skilled in showcasing client accomplishments in 40+ industries. In addition to resume writing, ResumeEdge also specializes in resume editing, cover letters, LinkedIn profiles and interview coaching through its JobInterviewEdge service.

Darlene Z.

Darlene Zambruski is a resume writing expert and CPRW (Certified Professional Resume Writer) with more than 13 years of industry experience. She has authored 10,000+ resumes in every industry and at every career level.

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